How to Design your Responsive Website

Responsive Web Development

With mobile devices becoming the primary way people experience the web, responsive design is more important than ever. But responsive design doesn’t just create a consistent mobile experience. It’s also changed the way we design for all screens, encouraging simpler layouts and more streamlined experiences. Whether you’re doing a responsive redesign or starting from scratch, these tips and tricks will help you along the way.

  • Find out the best navigation

            Your design needs to work within the limitations of smaller screens.  Simplify your navigational choices as much as you can and use icons paired with text, in-page links, collapsible menus, and dropdowns to get people where they need to go. Remember that hidden navigational choices are roughly half as discoverable as apparent ones, and lengthen time to complete tasks, so do your best to make access to core pages visually obvious.

  • Visualize content organization before you design

            Content and design flourish when developed in tandem. Content organization is more than just copying and pasting blocks of text to see where they’ll fit on a page. Your content is the story you’re trying to tell your audience.

  • Use only the words you need

      With mobile devices, you must work within the confines of smaller screens. That means writing more economically, ensuring that every word helps move your story forward. Don’t take content direct from desktop. Consolidate copy, use bullet points and other structural styles, and trim the fat wherever you can.

  • Typography is very much important on smaller screens

      Make sure you scale font size, line-height, and width to best fit differing screen sizes. When you’re designing for mobile device, remember that a huge font may push the important content you want someone to read further down on a page. So consider all the other design methods in your toolkit to add drama: vary font weights, use all caps or all lowercase, or use color to differentiate content sections from other elements on the page.

  • Embrace negative space

You need to take a minimalistic approach to content and navigation when creating a responsive design — but you also don’t want to leave anything vital out. Make use of negative space (aka, whitespace) to create breaks in your design and highlight those areas of content that you don’t want anyone to miss.

  • Make your page fast by using responsive images

      One of the problems people run into with responsive design is that while images visually scale on smaller devices, they’re still 3MB in size and slow load times to a crawl. Responsive images offer a powerful and effective workaround, but are laborious and painful to hand code.

  • Recognise the power of Flexbox  within your layouts

      Flexbox is a CSS3 layout module that makes sure your layout is fluidly responsive to different devices. Fairly simple in principle, but it allows a powerful level of flexibility.

Checkout some of the best responsive websites here.

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